Friday, 27 June 2014

Freycob's Food

You can find all my recipes, reviews and foodie finds on my other blog:

www.freycob.co.uk


Please pop over and be inspired!

Wednesday, 25 June 2014

Rhubarb, Apple & Ginger Crumble

My rhubarb is a little pathetic this year; yielding a measly 4 sticks, which is not really enough to make a crumble for a family of 4. Not to be deterred, I grabbed a couple of dessert apples from the fruit bowl and a jar of crystallised ginger from the cupboard and whipped up a pudding in less than an hour (and that included washing up!) I think that rhubarb and ginger are a perfect combination, and judging by the empty bowls all round, my family think so too.  Some of the ingredients I didn't measure out personally, but to help you, I've given you the approximate quantities that I used for the fruit base.

4 sticks Rhubarb
2 dessert Apples
3 balls crystallised ginger
2tbs (rounded) Soft dark brown sugar
Crumble
200g Self raising flour
100g Unsalted butter
100g Soft dark brown sugar
2tsp Ground ginger

1. Preheat your oven to 180C.
2. Peel and slice the rhubarb into 1.5cm slices.
3. Dice the apples into 1cm cubes.
4. Chop the crystallised ginger quite finely.
5. Place the rhubarb, apples, ginger and sugar into a saucepan with 30ml cold water.
6. Bring to a gentle boil, then simmer for about 10 minutes until the fruit has started to soften and release their juices.
7. In a food processor, blitz the flour, cold butter, sugar and ground ginger until it resembles breadcrumbs.
8. Pour the fruit into a heatproof dish and top with the crumble mix.
9. Bake for 25-30 minutes until the top is golden.


Serve with cream, custard, clotted cream or ice cream. I love the fruity 'jam' that mixes with the edges of the crumble mix as it bubbles though.  Enjoy!


Saturday, 7 June 2014

PG Tips Fruit Infusions - They're refreshingly good!


When this hamper arrived on my doorstep full of PG Tips herbal infusions and green teas, I really was spoiled for choice on which one to enjoy first! A lover of fruit teas and herbal infusions, it was a difficult decision to make.  So, how do you make such a decision?  Well, like this of course!


Now, just to clarify, Monkey didn't bring the teas to me personally and hasn't come to visit, but when he does, I will be grabbing him firmly by his toe!

I chose the Juicy Red Berries, while my husband went for his favourite of a smooth Green Tea, but with a hint of mandarin orange.

I always leave my bag in my cup; not just for a few minutes but for the whole duration of my drink, whilst he dunks the bag in and takes it out again before it gets too strong.

Long before the water hit my teabag, as soon as I opened the box, I was hit with the most amazing fruity smell that had my taste buds bursting into life in anticipation of what was to come.  I wasn't disappointed either!  The warm, richly coloured, red berry infusion really did taste as good as it smelled.

In contrast the cool, muted colour of the mandarin orange green tea was delicate in both fragrance and colour.

We've now gone through every box of the teas (with the exception of the Camomile, because I really don't like Camomile tea one tiny bit, sorry Monkey, but not even yours!)

The Spices & Mint tea is delicious as a drink but I wanted to give it a try in a fruited tea loaf to see what it would be like.




What a fabulous taste too!  So different but subtle with the slight heat of the spices and the cool of the mint. A winner in my family's eyes.

Onto another favourite - Peppermint.  Everyone loves peppermint tea, yes? Good! Then you'll like this one too then because it's fresh, minty & delicious.  Enough said!


Thanks to PG Tips' PR company for sending me a free hamper of fruit infusions and green teas to sample. Only a couple of random bags and the box of camomile ones left, so they must have been good, mustn't they? 





Friday, 6 June 2014

Book Review - Born & Bread - Robert Swift

I had the pleasure to meet Robert Swift, a 5th generation family baker from Richard C Swift Ltd in Shropshire at the Brompton Cookery School recently.  Rob is clearly an incredibly passionate man when it comes to yeast, dough and bread. Looking at his lineage, you really can say that it's in his blood!  We were given a potted history of the family business which is traceable back over 150 years to his great-great-great aunt, Hannah Swift, when she began her bakery in 1863.  Long before the commercial bakeries with their artificial proving methods were ever thought of, this innovate and hardworking lady was producing bread using only four simple ingredients; flour, water, salt and yeast along with a fifth secret ingredient; a huge pinch of love and passion.  Something that is the ethos of the business still today.

You're introduced to the family line in Rob's book, 'Born & Bread', starting with Hannah and continuing through to Rob today who has introduced a sixth generation into the business in the form of his two children, who will no doubt grow up with the family passion and continue to grow the business and traditions into the future and beyond.


Along with his wife, Lucinda, he has also developed a new company, Bread2Bake, which provides master classes and services an ever-growing number of farmers' markets, food festivals and other shows with demonstrations.

I was lucky enough to have front row seats to one of Rob's masterclasses as part of the BBC Good Food Show Midlands Blogger event at Marcus Bean's Brompton Cookery School in Shropshire in May.  After a very early morning in the bakery, Rob brought along some of his prepared dough and introduced us to the methodology of creating a dough that would rise every time with only the simplest of ingredients.  He then went on to teach us how to shape and flavour the dough to produce an artisan loaf that was truly delicious and perfectly turned out.



We were treated to a host of different breads that Rob had made for lunch to go with the amazing quiche that Marcus made for us, along with British tomatoes and other delicious artisan foods from stallholders that would be attending the BBC Good Food Show, Summer 2014.


Kindly, we were each given a copy of Rob's book Born & Bread to re-create our own yeasted wonders at home.  It's been the book which has become my bedtime reading each evening for the last couple of weeks and one that I've thoroughly enjoyed reading and digesting (not literally, I'm sure you understand!)


In the book, Rob introduces you to the life of bread, through the stages of Infancy, Adolescence and Maturity, helping you to understand what goes on in each of these stages to produce the perfect loaf.  It includes the mandatory section on 'Tools of the Trade', none of which are expensive or difficult for the beginner to get hold of.  It then gets into the science of bread and 'The Gluten Framework' which (as an inner geek) is fascinating and insightful to understand, but of course you don't have to be a geek to read and understand the book as it's beautifully and very clearly illustrated with photographs throughout. You're introduced to each ingredient thoroughly and taught their function in the chemistry of baking the perfect loaf.

Then on to the important part of the book - the recipes.  From a basic white dough and how to create, nurture, check, prove, shape and bake it through to the wholemeal loaf, via Brioche, Focaccia, Iced fingers, Ludlow Brewery beer bread, Pain au Chocolate, Poolish starters, Savoury Breads, Soda and Sourdough breads and sweet breads and cakes.  In all a whole cacophony of 160 pages of delicious and totally mouthwatering creations.

Rob, Sir, I salute you and your heritage. Thank you for bringing your passion into the kitchen and from your heart to those who are lucky enough to witness it first hand. Here's to the next 150 years business for you and your family.

I was given a copy of Robert Swift's book, Born & Bread, free of charge as part of the BBC Good Food Show Blogger event.  I was not under obligation to review it, positive or otherwise, but am genuinely impressed at the content.

Sunday, 1 June 2014

Curry paste - the homemade version

In 1989, just after we got married, I bought a book on Curries by Pat Chapman from Sainsbury's.  Despite now owning several other curry recipe books, it's still our 'go to' book for all things spicy!  We've been blending the spices into curry powder and cooking it out in to a curry paste ever since then.  It's been tried and tested by many a guest to our house over the years, and as I used almost the last of my current batch making my chicken curry for dinner last night, I had to make some more today.  The benefit of making it today in the warm, dry weather, meant that I could cook it outdoors on my Cadac barbeque in the paella pan; sharing the amazing aroma with my neighbours and leaving my house smelling fragrant and not spicy for the next few days!

It's incredibly simple to do, so here it is in it's entirety.  All teaspoon measurements are ROUNDED.

12tsp Ground Coriander
6tsp Ground Cumin
5tsp Gram flour
5tsp Garlic powder
4tsp Fenugreek seeds
4tsp Paprika*
4tsp Turmeric
4tsp Garam Masala
1tsp Asafoetida
1tsp Ground Ginger
1tsp Chilli powder*
1tsp Mustard powder*
1tsp White ground Pepper
250ml Cider vinegar
250ml Vegetable oil



1. Measure all your ingredients into a large bowl.


2. Pour in your cider vinegar and enough cold water to make a paste that 'dollops' off the spoon without being too runny.


3. Heat the oil in a large frying pan or wok (I used my paella pan on my Cadac).

4. Add the curry paste (be careful as it'll spit initially due to the water content).

5. Cook for about 15 minutes until the water has evaporated.  You'll know it's cooked as when you leave it for a short while, the oil will rise to the surface of the paste.


6. Allow to cool for a few minutes and then decant into sterilised jars.

7. Heat a little more oil and pour over the top of the curry paste to prevent air getting to it.

8. Seal the jars and store in a cool, dark place for a couple of weeks before using.


The recipe above is for a mild curry paste, however if you increase the quantities of Paprika, Chiili and Mustard you can increase the heat to your own preference. Similarly, if you don't have all the ingredients listed above, it's fine to leave one or two of the smaller quantities out.


This goes perfectly in my Chicken Curry Recipe.

The curry paste recipe is NOT originally my own, but it's one we've been using for 25 years now. Thanks to Pat Chapman and to Sainsbury's for a fabulous book - you should re-publish this!

Elderflower, Ginger Beer & Lemon fizz

The quickest, most refreshing drink, served cold but with the heat of non alcoholic ginger beer.

Elderflower cordial
Old Jamaica Ginger Beer
Lemon juice
Fresh mint

1. Add a splash of elderflower cordial to your glass.
2. Squeeze in some lemon juice.
3. Gently rub the fresh mint to bruise it & release the mint oil. Throw this into your glass.
4. Top up with ginger beer.
5. Enjoy the perfect drink on a hot day!

Can be served over ice, or alternatively chill everything beforehand.


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